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Mary Rose – Archive Digitisation – October 2017

Mary Rose – Digitisation Blog – October 2017

October has been a major month in the Digitisation project in terms of milestones that we have now reached.  Firstly, the Collections Volunteers have completed the digitisation of the 35mm slides currently held in the archive!  This is a huge achievement in itself, but on top of this – the team also passed the 10,000 digitised images mark.  Naturally, we celebrated these landmarks with cake!

 

10000 slides

 

When we reached 10,000, we put the new marker on our progress ‘thermometer’ (above) and it gave us a good opportunity to look back on all of the images that have now been digitised.

 

This week, we have been starting work on the digitisation of the next type of photographic material (35mm film strips and larger format transparencies).  The team have wasted no time in getting stuck straight into this next part of the project and it is now fully underway.

 

Digitisation highlights

This month, the image highlights have been chosen by the Collections Volunteers themselves.  There are some really interesting and emotive highlight pictures and everyone kindly provided a short caption as to why they chose the image:

 

A diver working on the wreck of the Mary Rose. [MR80.0045T(A)]

This is one of my favourite slides. It shows a diver working on the wreck of the Mary Rose. [MR80.0045T(A)]

This is a really interesting action shot, I like that you can see the camera man capturing history as it happens. Everyone’s focus is on the cannon, it must have been a really exciting moment and I think this photo captures that very well. [MR80.0875T]

This fantastic image is of one of the lion head ‘dolphins’ on a large bronze gun in the museum, called a demi-culverin. This gun is particularly ornate, and has the Tudor Rose seal and an inscription referring to Henry VIII himself on it. The reason I chose this picture is the stunning photography – the downward tilting angle of the shot is incredibly emotive and shows the beautiful detailing of the lion head, as well as picking up the underlying flecks of the original bronze colour. This photo also radiates power, reflecting the symbolism of the lion to English royalty. [MR80.0914T]

This fantastic image is of one of the lion head ‘dolphins’ on a large bronze gun in the museum, called a demi-culverin. This gun is particularly ornate, and has the Tudor Rose seal and an inscription referring to Henry VIII himself on it. The reason I chose this picture is the stunning photography – the downward tilting angle of the shot is incredibly emotive and shows the beautiful detailing of the lion head, as well as picking up the underlying flecks of the original bronze colour. This photo also radiates power, reflecting the symbolism of the lion to English royalty. [MR80.0914T]

I selected this image as it represents the importance of the longbow finds on the Mary Rose. The English longbow has become a significant object in British history but until the discovery of the Mary Rose only one or two incomplete examples had survived. The bows found on the Mary Rose were still in their original chests and usable even after 450 years underwater. This image was taken in 1981 at a time when the underwater visibility was exceptionally clear and shows some bows being excavated from the seabed. [MR81.5625T]

I selected this image as it represents the importance of the longbow finds on the Mary Rose. The English longbow has become a significant object in British history but until the discovery of the Mary Rose only one or two incomplete examples had survived. The bows found on the Mary Rose were still in their original chests and usable even after 450 years underwater. This image was taken in 1981 at a time when the underwater visibility was exceptionally clear and shows some bows being excavated from the seabed. [MR81.5625T]

I have chosen the photograph of the linstocks as they are lovely examples of individual skill and taste. [MR82.0345T]

I have chosen the photograph of the linstocks as they are lovely examples of individual skill and taste. [MR82.0345T]

This photo of a knife sheath shows the skill and pride of craftsmanship used for the smallest objects [MR82.0292T]

This photo of a knife sheath shows the skill and pride of craftsmanship used for the smallest objects [MR82.0292T]

Cheers to the Mary Rose from Margaret Rule. She breaks the surface after 437 years. So much achieved and so much still to do as a new era dawns in her life. [MR82.7047T]

Cheers to the Mary Rose from Margaret Rule. She breaks the surface after 437 years. So much achieved and so much still to do as a new era dawns in her life. [MR82.7047T]

It was strange to see two mermen emblazoned on the gun barrel and in obvious agony! Beautifully depicted moulding. [MR86.0157T(A)]

It was strange to see two mermen emblazoned on the gun barrel and in obvious agony! Beautifully depicted moulding. [MR86.0157T(A)]

The composition of this image is what draws my attention to it. The ship, in its yellow framework, has been raised. You can’t see many details of the ship but it is the main focus of the image as it has been perfectly framed by two red objects; a boat and a flag flying in the wind. This image gives off many emotions, the main one I feel, because of the lighting from the setting sun, is pride. [MR86.0285T]

The composition of this image is what draws my attention to it. The ship, in its yellow framework, has been raised. You can’t see many details of the ship but it is the main focus of the image as it has been perfectly framed by two red objects; a boat and a flag flying in the wind. This image gives off many emotions, the main one I feel, because of the lighting from the setting sun, is pride. [MR86.0285T]

These iron ringbolts located either side of a gunport inside the ship would be attached to the gun carriage with ropes. [MR80.0914T]

These iron ringbolts located either side of a gunport inside the ship would be attached to the gun carriage with ropes. [MR80.0914T]

Look ahead

Over the next couple of weeks, we are delighted to be welcoming some new members to the Collections Volunteer team!  We will be introducing them to the Mary Rose Trust, the Museum as well as the digitisation project.

Alastair Miles

Collections Manager

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