Posts By: Simon Clabby

Hatch At Crufts

In the first of an occasional series, we’re going back to March 2010, when The Mary Rose’s dog went walkies for the first time in nearly 500 years! Our blogger Simon explains…   Back in 2010, the Mary Rose Museum was still based in an old boathouse near the entrance to Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, the… Read more »

Everybody goes to the toilet, even in Tudor times, but what facilities were available on the Mary Rose?   There is little to show what the crew did when they were ‘caught short’, as on vessels of this time the toilets, or heads, were usually located at the very front, or bow of the ship,… Read more »

If you visit our neighbour HMS Victory at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, in the Port arena (the one they share with us) is an information board naming all 821 crew who fought at the battle of Trafalgar. People find it fascinating looking up the names, seeing if they have a relative on board (though if it’s… Read more »

Those of you with long memories may remember a postcard we used to sell in the museum shop depicting the Mary Rose, the Great Harry and two other, unnamed vessels, with Portsmouth’s Round Tower in the background, with a caption that read “Cowes Week 1545”. While this was obviously a joke (Cowes Week only began… Read more »

A Year at the Mary Rose Museum A review of 2014 by our blogger, Simon. All opinions are his, and don’t necessarily reflect those of the Mary Rose Trust. January. January was a quiet one, not much happening other than our Chief Executive and Head of Conservation receiving a CBE and MBE respectively in the… Read more »

We get asked a lot of questions, both in the museum and online, ranging from the basic (‘how long was the Mary Rose?’ – The hull on display is 32 m long, the whole ship, from bowstem to sterncastle is estimated to have been around 42 metres when she sank.) to the absurdly technical (‘What is… Read more »

An international team of scientists have identified the youngest member of the Mary Rose’s crew: The ship’s dog. Recovered over a period of several months, the dog was found partially outside the carpenter’s cabin, the rest inside, under a pile of chests belonging to the carpenter and several gunners.   After many years in the… Read more »

As you may recall, the Tudor attempts to recover the Mary Rose didn’t go well, and the ship was abandoned, and eventually became lost.   It wasn’t until 1836 that anyone had any idea that something was still down there. In June 1836 fishermen began snagging their nets on something on the sea bed. Henry… Read more »

The raising of the Mary Rose has become a standard by which all other large scale archaeological excavations is compared, due to its impact in the public eye, something that hadn’t really happened since the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922. From the media circus around the identification of the skeleton of Richard… Read more »

This blog is a sort-of sequel to one written for the Huffington Post, so once you’ve read that, come back…   Right, hope you enjoyed it. While the maiden voyage myth (if you skipped the link, the Mary Rose had time between launching and sinking to enjoy a 34 year long career) is our most… Read more »