Blog

The (Tudor) Night before Christmas by Sarah Hemming (with apologies to Clement Clarke Moore)     T’was the night before Christmas, as the old poem goes Not a creature was stirring upon the ship, Mary Rose; The rigging was hung from the masts with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there; The… Read more »

Christmas Stocking on the Galley

The Mary Rose saw 33 Christmases during her career as a warship, usually moored either somewhere in the Thames or here in Portsmouth, except during the winter of 1513 when she was part of a small patrolling unit under the command of Sir Weston Browne.   Whilst she was laid up there would be a… Read more »

  Life on board the Mary Rose wasn’t all fighting, working and eating weevily biscuits, there was time for fun too. Among the objects recovered from the Mary Rose were several musical instruments, including a Still Shawm, not heard in centuries, drums, pipes and fiddles, all of which appear to have been tuned to play… Read more »

We get asked a lot of questions, both in the museum and online, ranging from the basic (‘how long was the Mary Rose?’ – The hull on display is 32 m long, the whole ship, from bowstem to sterncastle is estimated to have been around 42 metres when she sank.) to the absurdly technical (‘What is… Read more »

An international team of scientists have identified the youngest member of the Mary Rose’s crew: The ship’s dog. Recovered over a period of several months, the dog was found partially outside the carpenter’s cabin, the rest inside, under a pile of chests belonging to the carpenter and several gunners.   After many years in the… Read more »

As you may recall, the Tudor attempts to recover the Mary Rose didn’t go well, and the ship was abandoned, and eventually became lost.   It wasn’t until 1836 that anyone had any idea that something was still down there. In June 1836 fishermen began snagging their nets on something on the sea bed. Henry… Read more »

The raising of the Mary Rose has become a standard by which all other large scale archaeological excavations is compared, due to its impact in the public eye, something that hadn’t really happened since the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922. From the media circus around the identification of the skeleton of Richard… Read more »

Charlie and June have volunteered at the museum for the last 8 years. They work together on the handling tables around the museum explaining a variety of replica artefacts to our visitors. A favourite is the Surgeon’s table with the Tudor doctor’s equipment for making medicines and treating injuries. What most visitors do not realise… Read more »

This blog is a sort-of sequel to one written for the Huffington Post, so once you’ve read that, come back…   Right, hope you enjoyed it. While the maiden voyage myth (if you skipped the link, the Mary Rose had time between launching and sinking to enjoy a 34 year long career) is our most… Read more »

“Hi, it’s Georgia from Peter Symonds College. This summer I had the opportunity to volunteer at the Mary Rose Museum to enhance my learning about Tudor history and to give me an experience working in museums. I learned so much about the Mary Rose itself, and about how the museum functioned – plus it gives… Read more »