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Science in the Service of Henry VIII

SCIENCE IN THE SERVICE OF HENRY VIII

THE MARY ROSE TRUST AT NEW SCIENTIST LIVE 2017

EXCEL LONDON, THURSDAY 28 SEPTEMBER – SUNDAY 1 OCTOBER 2017

Dr Eleanor Schofield, Head of Conservation & Collections Care at the Mary Rose Trust © Chris Ison, Courtesy Mary Rose Trust

Dr Eleanor Schofield, Head of Conservation & Collections Care at the Mary Rose Trust © Chris Ison, Courtesy Mary Rose Trust

The Mary Rose Trust is delighted to announce their participation in New Scientist Live, ‘the world’s most exciting festival of ideas’, from 28 September –1 October 2017 at the ExCel arena, London. As part of the impressive talks programme, Dr Eleanor Schofield, Head of Conservation & Collections Care at the Mary Rose Trust will be giving a talk on Science in the Service of Henry VIII. The talk will take place on Sunday 1 October at 11:45am in the Engineering Theatre and will be free to attend with a valid ticket to the festival.

 

The Mary Rose team will also have a stand at the show for the duration of the weekend, giving visitors the chance to learn more about the importance of the Trust’s scientific work and research. The only heritage science institution at the festival, the stand will display items from the collection and visitors will have the wonderful opportunity to handle precious Tudor artefacts. On the stand will be a parrel ball, used to move the yard arms up and down the masts on the ship, which was recovered from the Mary Rose wreck site, along with over 19,000 other artefacts. In 2011, it was selected to be taken into space aboard Endeavour on her last ever mission as part of NASA’s space shuttle program. It spent 17 days in orbit before returning to earth.

 

Furthermore, Dr Schofield and team will be giving visitors an exciting insight into conservation techniques showcasing state of the art equipment used to help identify different metals. Henry VIII manipulated coinage during his reign, replacing the expensive metals with cheaper ones, and this technique was used to examine the metal work and coins recovered from the Mary Rose.

 

New Scientist LiveThis October marks the 35th anniversary of Henry VIII’s sunken flagship being raised from the Solent seabed. This project was the result of years of research, planning and diving and it pioneered several ground-breaking marine archaeology techniques. Continued research, conservation, and public display of the ship has turned the Mary Rose at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard into a world-class visitor experience and a vital scientific and educational resource. It is the perfect addition to the impressive line-up of speakers and institutions at this year’s New Scientist Live.

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