Posts Tagged: history

The bell of HMS Hood

You may remember last year we worked with Micropasts to produce a 3D model of the Mary Rose’s bell. This year, we’re working with them and the null to produce models of the bell of HMS Hood, which was conserved by Mary Rose Archaeological Services.   Chiara Bonnachi of Micropasts and Alastair Miles of the… Read more »

Museum of the Ancient Ships of Pisa

Some members of the Mary Rose conservation team, myself included, recently had the privilege to spend a week in Florence, Italy, to attend WOAM 2016, which is a conference organised every three years by the ICOM-CC working group for Wet Organic Archaeological Materials (WOAM for short!). ICOM-CC stands for International Council of Museums – Committee… Read more »

While  documentation exists to show that the Mary Rose was originally ordered in January 1510, she appears not to have had a name at the time.   Indeed, it wouldn’t be until 18 months later that we get the first mention of the Mary Rose by name, in a somewhat rambling letter from Robert Brigandine,… Read more »

A snippet of interesting trivia relating to the Mary Rose, and Tudor life in general. Updated most Tuesdays. Follow us on Twitter at @MaryRoseMuseum, or the hashtag #TudorTrivia How tall were the Crew of the Mary Rose? There’s a popular myth that people were considerably smaller in the past, varying from being about a foot shorter than… Read more »

Everybody goes to the toilet, even in Tudor times, but what facilities were available on the Mary Rose?   There is little to show what the crew did when they were ‘caught short’, as on vessels of this time the toilets, or heads, were usually located at the very front, or bow of the ship,… Read more »

As a visitor to the Mary Rose Museum it would be hard not to notice the Cowdray Engraving that dominates the first gallery that you enter, staff and volunteers talk about it and you can even buy merchandise in our shop featuring its design!   But what’s it all about? Where did it come from… Read more »

If you visit our neighbour HMS Victory at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, in the Port arena (the one they share with us) is an information board naming all 821 crew who fought at the battle of Trafalgar. People find it fascinating looking up the names, seeing if they have a relative on board (though if it’s… Read more »

Those of you with long memories may remember a postcard we used to sell in the museum shop depicting the Mary Rose, the Great Harry and two other, unnamed vessels, with Portsmouth’s Round Tower in the background, with a caption that read “Cowes Week 1545”. While this was obviously a joke (Cowes Week only began… Read more »

We get asked a lot of questions, both in the museum and online, ranging from the basic (‘how long was the Mary Rose?’ – The hull on display is 32 m long, the whole ship, from bowstem to sterncastle is estimated to have been around 42 metres when she sank.) to the absurdly technical (‘What is… Read more »

An international team of scientists have identified the youngest member of the Mary Rose’s crew: The ship’s dog. Recovered over a period of several months, the dog was found partially outside the carpenter’s cabin, the rest inside, under a pile of chests belonging to the carpenter and several gunners.   After many years in the… Read more »