Posts Tagged: tudor

Tabor Pipe This Tabor pipe, found in on the Orlop Deck of the Mary Rose, would have been played alongside the Tabor Drum by the same musician; one hand playing the beat, the other fingering the pipe. This was made possible by the pipe only having three holes, for the middle and index fingers and the thumb,… Read more »

Tabor Drum This drum, made of a thin sheet of oak, was found in storage in the hold of the Mary Rose.   Although the drumhead has not survived (the top surface in this picture is part of the leather case it was recovered in), they were probably made of untanned vellum, which does not… Read more »

While  documentation exists to show that the Mary Rose was originally ordered in January 1510, she appears not to have had a name at the time.   Indeed, it wouldn’t be until 18 months later that we get the first mention of the Mary Rose by name, in a somewhat rambling letter from Robert Brigandine,… Read more »

A snippet of interesting trivia relating to the Mary Rose, and Tudor life in general. Updated most Tuesdays. Follow us on Twitter at @MaryRoseMuseum, or the hashtag #TudorTrivia How tall were the Crew of the Mary Rose? There’s a popular myth that people were considerably smaller in the past, varying from being about a foot shorter than… Read more »

Everybody goes to the toilet, even in Tudor times, but what facilities were available on the Mary Rose?   There is little to show what the crew did when they were ‘caught short’, as on vessels of this time the toilets, or heads, were usually located at the very front, or bow of the ship,… Read more »

Hello, I’m Johanna, one of the conservators at the Mary Rose Trust, and I’ll be taking you through some of the work that is happening behind the scenes at the museum. This particular post will cover a set of objects I have devoted a fair bit of my time here to – logs!   Over… Read more »

New stable isotope and ancient DNA analysis of the bones of stored cod provisions recovered from the wreck of the Tudor warship Mary Rose, which sank off the coast of southern England in 1545, has revealed that the fish in the ship’s stores had been caught in surprisingly distant waters: the northern North Sea and… Read more »